Back to top

Research

Other Research Papers

Images of Home

Author:
Dr Michelle Duffy

This is project invited children from Officer Primary School to explore what living in Cardinia Shire\’s growth corridors means in terms ‘home’ in a rapidly changing environment. After recording everyday sounds,the children talked to us about what made these sounds meaningful to them, then worked with the sound designer to create a sound art piece. Recordings were made in and around Officer Primary School, including the Rythdale Officer Cardinia Football Club, and Officer Primary school grounds.

Dr Michelle Duffy from Monash
Email: Michelle.Duffy@monash.edu

Art Research in Catholic Healthcare

Author:
Associate Professor Lindsay Farrell

The aim of the Art Research in Catholic Healthcare (ARCH) project is to formally evaluate the impact of art within the Catholic healthcare setting on spiritual wellbeing, including sense of meaning and purpose. It will use surveys and stakeholder discussions to measure the effect of art in Catholic healthcare. This study is underway to investigate the way people in Catholic Healthcare settings respond to the art they see around them. The term ‘art’ is considered to include paintings, sculptures and other decorations within the healthcare facility.

Associate Professor Lindsay Farrell from Australian Catholic University (Brisbane Campus)
Email:  lindsay.farrell@acu.edu.au

Growing up with cancer

Author:
Associate Professor Ian Kerridge

Our research involved 20 cancer survivors (aged 15-30 years) participating in research and creative activities. Working with a visual artist (Kris Smith), they created self-portraits; mixed media, graphic, photographic, and musical representations of themselves and their cancer journey. Interviews with a researcher provided material for the generation of self-portraits, while exploratory work during the creative process generated reflections for subsequent interviews.

Associate Professor Ian Kerridge from University of Sydney and University of Newcastle, Australia
Email: GUWC.research@usyd.edu.au

Aesthetics for Visual Arts in Hospitals

Author:
Dr Jillian Gates from University of Sydney

This thesis is the outcome of this original inquiry and examines the questions, how canvisual arts be received in hospitals? and how does western society represent illness and death? These questions explores how patients, their family members, and carers respond to art in hospitals, while acknowledging their discomfort experienced in hospital settings. This inquiry took the form of a comparative case study between Balmain and Wyong Hospitals, NSW, Australia. The aim of the study was to produce a reflective and empathetic response to elderly patients in waiting rooms as a mode to investigate the potential of evidence based art for hospitals. The intention was to produce a series of digital photographs that reflected the art pref erence of elderly patients. The out comes of the study uncovered the patients waiting experience and recorded their levels of discomfort. It established the potential and significance of landscape photography in hospital waiting rooms to create a less threatening environment. The participants selected landscapes as their preferred subject matter for visual arts in hospitals. The study contributes to Australian arts health research by comparing Australian arts health projects to international examples. These comparisons indicate that further research is required to comprehensively understand the hospital waiting experience of Australian patients, and their family members in order to create visual arts that they can appreciate and respond to.

Effectiveness of Participative Community Singing Intervention Program on Promoting Resilience and Mental Health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in Australia

Author:
Dr. Jing Sun

Citation for the article: Sun, J. & Buys, N. (2012). Effectiveness of participative community singing intervention program on promoting resilience and mental health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia. Essential Notes in Psychiatry, Dr. Victor Olisah (Ed.), ISBN: 978-953-51-0574-9, InTech, Available from: http://www.intechopen.com/books/essential-notes-in-psychiatry/Effectiveness of participative community singing intervention program on promoting resilience and me.

Defining arts engagement for population-based health research: Art forms, activities and level of engagement

Author:
Christina Davies (nee Mills)

The aim of this study was to elucidate terminology central to understanding the arts/health causal pathway by defining arts engagement via art forms, activities and level of engagement. Study findings provide guidance about which art forms/activities should be included in population surveys and provide a measure of arts exposure. Please contact the author for more information or the article is available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17533015.2012.656201#preview

Christina Davies (nee Mills) from The University of Western Australia
Email: christina.davies@westnet.com.au

The effectiveness of youth audience participation at dance performances to promote the “Be Active” physical activity message

Author:
Christina Davies (nee Mills)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the cognitive impact (awareness, comprehension, acceptance, intention & action) of the “Be Active” message at sponsored dance performances participated in by young people as part of an audience. Findings suggest that performing arts events can be utilised as a setting to promote physical activity to young people. Please contact the author for more information or the article is available at: http://www.abp.unimelb.edu.au/unesco/ejournal/vol-two-issue-two.html

Christina Davies (nee Mills) from The University of Western Australia
Email: christina.davies@westnet.com.au

Are the arts an effective setting for promoting health messages?

Author:
Christina Davies (nee Mills)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the success of Healthway arts sponsorship program to promote health messages (physical activity, sun protection, nutrition, alcohol & smoking). Findings suggest the arts have merit beyond intrinsic artistic value and are a viable setting for promoting health to the general population. Please contact the principal researcher for more information or the article is available at: http://rsh.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/10/05/1757913911419895.abstract?rss=1

Christina Davies (nee Mills) from The University of Western Australia
Email: christina.davies@westnet.com.au

Evidence Brief- Arts and Health

Author:
Health Policy Research Institute

The overall finding of the review is that utilising the arts in health settings can lead to greater effectiveness and efficiency in healthcare delivery.
Evidence also suggests the potential for overall cost savings through better management of symptoms and reduced use of health services.

Arts and Health – A Guide to the Evidence

Author:
Dr Christine Putland

AHF commissioned this paper to support the work of the Ministerial Working Group to develop a national arts and health framework. Arts and Health is an emerging field encompassing a broad and diverse range of practice. Evidence for the connections between the arts and health and wellbeing is growing. Existing evidence focuses on select areas of practice rather than giving an overview. Dr Putland’s report draws on such reviews, offering a quick guide to current evidence across the entire field.

Dr Christine Putland from Independent Consultant – Arts and Health

Arts, Health and Wellbeing Beyond the Millennium: How far have we come and where do we want to go?

Author:
Royal Society for Public Health, Philipp Family Foundation

This report gives an overview of the arts and health field, with particular reference to the UK and New Zealand.

It provides a review of the evidence for the benefits of the arts to health, as well as the policy context of commissioning arts and health initiatives. It also highlights the potential role arts can play within professional education contexts (for example within medical training) as well as within therapy, healthcare and community settings.

It includes case studies and subjective reflections on how the arts can interact with health and wellbeing, and also suggests ways forward for development of the arts in support of culture, health and wellbeing.

Pages